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Knot again! Another knotweed liability case

30 September 2019

We are all aware of the potential liabilities that the dreaded Japanese knotweed may bring. This can range from civil liability to a neighbour, or even criminal liability if reasonable measures are not taken to control the invasive plant.

Recently, on behalf of several neighbouring owners, Bristol City Council prosecuted a residential property company under the Antisocial Behaviour Crime And Policing Act 2004, to force the company to address the detrimental effect of the knotweed.

The company was fined £18,000 by the court, plus costs, and was given 28 days in which to address the issue, as well as provide an action plan from a specialist company to tackle the problem.

Yet again, the Bristol City Council case demonstrates how it is vital for landowners to take a proactive approach to noticing and addressing knotweed, including having a strategy in place to halt its growth.

Generally, the best way to do this is to obtain specialist treatment from a professional, who will be able to give you an insurance-backed guarantee.

As always, if you need commercial and pragmatic legal advice, we’re here to help so please get in touch.

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Alasdair Garbutt LLB (Hons)
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Alasdair Garbutt
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