Back
Get in Touch Menu

Employment law and family businesses

14 September 2018

Nearly half of the private sector workforce works for a family business of some sort, making these businesses a vital cog in our economy. But family businesses sometimes suffer from a reputation of nepotism. If you’re running a family business, how can you make sure you’re playing fair, and guard against some common pitfalls?

Many family businesses grow rapidly and organically, with a culture of informality. There are lots of positive aspects to this method of growth, but on the downside, it can leave family business owners and managers in a vulnerable position.

This ‘informality culture’ can mean that, when working with family members, there is a real temptation to overlook simple documents such as handbooks, formal policies, contracts of employment or director’s service agreements.

It may seem over-the-top and somewhat pessimistic to have contracts in place between family members when all is running smoothly, however, circumstances change, and sadly our experience is that disputes do arise. Having formal contracts in place can help protect against the cost of an elongated legal argument over the nature of an individual’s involvement in the business, and help achieve a swift and amicable resolution.

A fair approach to recruitment is also essential. It is legal for family businesses to preferentially promote family members (the law protects against workplace discrimination based on ‘protected characteristics’ – and ‘family relationship’ isn’t one of those), but you should make sure that non-family employees receive similar salary and benefits in comparison to family members.

Suspicions of favouritism can lead to high staff turnover and low morale. You should maximise opportunities for career progression for all – you risk losing talent if there’s an assumption that only family members will progress within the business. An open and honest approach to how individuals can progress in the business is the best one.

Whether your business is a family one or not, our half-day workshop (on Wednesday 3 October) at Stonehouse Court Hotel will help give you peace of mind that your recruitment practices won’t land you in legal hot water.

Our employment law team will answer questions such as “is it OK to check candidates out on social media?” and “in which situations can I legally withdraw a job offer?”

Aimed at HR professionals, directors and executives responsible for risk management, the workshop will run from 9am-1:30pm and will include lunch, refreshments and networking opportunities.

Book online via Eventbrite. (tickets are £35 inc VAT).

Book here
Resources to help

Related articles

Do I really need to bother with a shareholders’ agreement?...

Corporate

When starting out, many businesses naturally want to keep costs to a minimum. This often results in them regarding a shareholders’ agreement as something optional or something to consider at…

Helen Howes LLM
Trainee solicitor

Protecting your brand on an international scale

Intellectual property & protection

Despite the significant resources which a company will allocate to international brand protection, it is surprising how often trade mark protection programmes are launched without a clear strategy. An international…

Kym Fletcher LLB (Hons) Euro
Consultant, solicitor

Brexit Q&A: How can my business manage post-Brexit risks?

Commercial

The key to navigating Brexit for any business is planning. Right now, despite the uncertainty around what Brexit may or may not look like, all businesses (whether they trade directly…

Chris Wills LLB (Hons)
Partner
Contact us